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20120801
20120831
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
of people out here at jpl about the prospect of putting curiosity down at this location and about the pictures and ideas that will come back right away. take a listen to what they said. >> there's a lot of intellectual investment. the team has developed a truly fantastic, novel architecture that is the product of our imagination. it is exactly what we think it should be. so we are all in on this. >> reporter: they are definitely all in, and we can give you kind of a close up look of what curiosity pretty much looks like. this is obviously not curiosity itself, it's a model. it gives you an idea. about the size of an suv, and the technology on this, kelly, is unbelievable. >> as you've heard, they're all in, and if all goes well, what will this rover be doing when it actually it was down? >> reporter: well, you can get an idea. we have animation but also from ththe --live look as well. this rover -- the best way to put it. if you've been to the grand canyon or seen pictures, you've seen stripes of rock going all the way down the canyon. each one of those stripes is a slice of life.
jpl employees on staff. host: kelly from massachusetts on our independent line. caller: you said you are giving companies $1.1 billion. why are we giving them money to reinvent the wheel? we already have the technology to get into space. why aren't we sharing the technology? guest: the companies are using nasa's technology to get into space. the space shuttle was an incredibly capable vehicle, but was not a cheap vehicle. it had a lot capabilities that we did not need. it was a vehicle that was good for lower earth orbits. they build two capabilities to replace it. the other is to go beyond lower earth orbit, but we did do with the apollo program. the space shuttle was a very high-tech vehicle but it wasn't the right vehicle for where we're going now. host: here are some numbers from 2011, looking at contract awards that were given how. host: these funds were given to companies. a question from monty on twitter . guest: the commercial applications can seem far- fetched. if you can find water, water can be turned into fuel that you can use to power a rocket. it can be useful for explo
go. engineers back at jpl send the signal. the signal goes back to that. it does maybe 10 or 15 feet, comes back, says i made it. got all the way here. let's do it again. they send another signal the next day or next day. >> can't wait until they head toward mt. sharp. chad myers, thank you. we'll keep talking about it. that's it for me. brooke baldwin here in new york. hope you wake up with me. in the meantime, here's wolf. in the meantime, here's wolf. your situation room begins now. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> happening now, the embattled senate candidate todd akin digging in. can republicans across the country whether this storm? >>> plus, all eyes on an actual storm. isaac may be headed toward the gop convention site in tampa. just as festivities get under way. we'll have the latest update from the national hurricane center. it's about to be released. we'll also bring it to you just as soon as it comes in. >>> an explosive outbreak of west nile virus consuming much of the united states right now. the death toll already topping 40 people and the number of cases
a bunch of former jpl employees on staff. host: kelly from massachusetts on our independent line. caller: you said you are giving companies $1.1 billion. why are we giving them money to reinvent the wheel? we already have the technology to get into space. why aren't we sharing the technology? guest: the companies are using nasa's technology to get into space. the space shuttle was an incredibly capable vehicle, but was not a cheap vehicle. it had a lot capabilities that we did not need. it was a vehicle that was good for lower earth orbits. they build two capabilities to replace it. the other is to go beyond lower earth orbit, but we did do with the apollo program. the space shuttle was a very high-tech vehicle but it wasn't the right vehicle for where we're going now. host: here are some numbers from 2011, looking at contract awards that were given how. host: these funds were given to companies. a question from monty on twitter. guest: the commercial applications can seem far- fetched. if you can find water, water can be turned into fuel that you can use to power a rocket. it can be use
us do it to request this wee. >> hubert humphrey. on c-span3. >> now nasa engineers at the jpl in california give an update on the mars rover curiosity mission. they talk about the space craft landing on mars earlier this week and show pictures. this is about an hour and 10 minutes. >> welcome to the jp el. we are holding our finalists conference for the week. -- our final conference this we. >> this week, we have had a tremendous success in landing on mars and the beginning of the exploration of a new world. we're going to hear from a senior software engineer who will give us a preview of what's coming up in the next few days for the rover. first, we're going to hear from the descent and landing team. they have been poring over the data and have some new details for us. first, i want to introduce the lead, adam, and his deputy, miguel san martin. >> thank you, veronica. we have a talented panel here for you today. miguel and i wanted to be the ones to introduce them to you. leading off the rotation, the operations lead for descent and landing. from the johnson space flight cen
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)

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